Modern Blacksmithing Rational Horse Shoeing and Wagon Making

with rules, tables, recipes, etc., useful to manufactures, blacksmiths, machinists, well-drillers, engineers, liverymen, horse-shoers, farmers, wagon-makers, mechanics, amateurs and all others who have occasion to perform the work for which this book is primarily intended. by J.G. Homstrom 1901

When a Plow Runs Too Deep, Takes Too Much Land, or Runs on its Nose

WHEN A PLOW RUNS TOO DEEP

There are two reasons for a plow running too deep: I, If the beam is more than fourteen inches high from the floor up to the lower side of it, then the beam should be heated over a place as far back as possible, and the same set down to its proper place. 2, If the point of the share has too much suction the plow will also run too deep. The right suction to give a plowshare is from ~ to h of an inch. If a plow don't run deep enough with this much as a draw, there must be something else out of shape; or, if it goes too deep, the fault must be looked for in the beam or in the tugs with small-sized horses. The point of a share should never be bent upwards in order to prevent the plow from going too deep. Set the share right, and if the plow then goes out of its proper way the fault must be found somewhere else.

WHEN A PLOW TAKES TOO MUCH LAND

If a 14-inch plow takes too much land the fault is either in the point of the share or in the beam. The point of a share should stand one-eighth of an inch to land, and the beam should stand about three inches to the right. This will be right for a 14-inch plow and two horses. If for a 16.inch plow and three horses, the beam should be in line with the landside.

HOW TO FIX A GANG PLOW THAT RUNS ON ITS NOSE

When a gang or sulky plow runs on its nose and shoves itself through the dirt, the fault is with the share or in the beam. In most cases this fault is a set back beam, but it might also be the result of a badlybent-down and out-of- shape landside point. If it is in the beam, take it out and heat it in the arch, then band it forward until the plow has the right shape, and it will run right.




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