Practical Carriage Building

Compiled by M.T. Richardson, Vol.1. 1891

Flaring Seat Corners

Laying off the width of board and obtaining the lines of bevel for the back Fig 211 - Bevel lines for end pieces Fig 212

Dress up boards for back and ends. Joint the edge that is to be used for the bottom. Gauge the outside for beveling, but do not bevel it until after the joints are laid out and cut. When two different bevels are to be used, as, for example, when the back is to be of the bevel indicated by line 1 in Fig. 211, and that of the ends is to be as shown by line 1, Fig. 213, two bevels should be used, each being set to its own proper angle at the outset, and not changed.

Bevels for the blocks to brace the corners for the construction shown in Fig 214 - Fig 213

Place the stock of the bevel for the back against the edge of the drafting board A, so that the blade lies against the point of intersection between the perpendicular D and the line C, and draw line 1, prolonging it until it meets the line B, all as indicated in Fig. 811. This will give the width of board necessary to use in order to give the seat a straight height equal to the space between B and C. Set the dividers with one foot at the intersection between lines 1 and B, and the other at the point of intersection between lines 1 and C and D. With the dividers thus set for radius, from the point of intersection between D and B as center, describe a short arc, cutting D as shown by E.

This operation will give the required width of board upon the perpendicular line D. Since the upper edge must project as much as the ends, bevel off at the same height, place the stock of the bevel set for the ends against the edge of drafting board A, so that the blade lies against the point of intersection between lines D and C, as shown by the dotted line A. Mark the intersection of the dotted line A with B, as shown at P, and draw line 2, extending from P to the point of intersection between the short arc E and the perpendicular D. This gives the bevel for the fore-projection an actual width. Set the dividers with one foot at the intersection of lines D and B, and the other foot at the intersection of lines D, G, and from the former point or center describe the arc M. From the point at which the arc M meets the line B draw the line 3 to the point of intersection between the short arc E and the perpendicular line D. This will be the bevel for a square miter.

All the lines by which to set the bevels for cutting the joints on the ends of the back are now obtained. Next lay out Fig. 212 by which to cut joints on the ends in the same general manner. The only difference to be observed is to substitute one bevel for the other; that is to say, where the bevel for the back was used, as above described, use the bevel for the end, and vice versa.

After this has been accomplished, the next work requiring attention is the shape of the blocks for bracing the corners. The bevels required in these parts are illustrated in Fig. 213. Use lines B, C, and D, as already described. Place the bevel as set for the back against the drafting board, so that the tongue shall lie against the point at which C and D intersect, and draw line 1. Next place one point of dividers at the intersection of lines B and D, and the other point at the intersection of lines B and 1, and from the former, as a center, describe the arc T in the figure. Place the bevel set for ends on the drafting board so that the tongue rests against the joint where the curve line T and the line D intersect; mark the point 8 and form dotted line A.




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