Practical Carriage Building

Compiled by M.T. Richardson, Vol.1. 1891

Wagon Wheels Part 4

The marker Fig 123

Fig. 118 (page 108) is a top view of a gauge, A being the head and B the keys. Fig. 119 (page 109) is a side view of the gauge. Fig. 120 (page 109) represents the principal part of the gauge. It is made of a piece of wood, three feet long and three inches wide by three-quarters of an inch thick. The two prongs are for the block shown in Fig. 121 to slide on.

The wagon wheel on the bench Fig 124

Fig. 121 (page 110) is a side view of the block A in Fig. 118, with the marker C C running through it. The two mortises in it slide over the prongs shown in Fig. 120. Fig. 122 (page 110) is the key used at B B in Fig. 118, to fasten the block, Fig. 121, as at B B in Fig. 118. Fig. 123 (page 110) is the marker used in the block shown in Fig. 121, and in Fig. 119. It is about twelve inches long and is made of half-inch round iron, threaded the whole length, except the loop at the upper end and the sharp point at the lower end.

The proper position of the wheel tenon in the felloe Fig 125

Fig. 124 represents a wheel on the bench, with blocks in the box, the rod B D passing through the bub, and the gauge on the rod at B. The marker E set to mark around outside of the felloe in order to make it perfectly round. It will be readily seen from the illustration that if the blocks are true, fit tightly in the box and on the rod, and the rod gauge. It is made of a piece of wood, three feet long and three inches wide by three-quarters of an inch thick. The two prongs are for the block shown in Fig. 121 to slide on.

The gauge used for squaring the rim of the wagon wheel Fig 126

In Fig. 125 A A represent a felloe, C a spoke, and T the tenon, lacking one-sixteenth of an inch of coming through to the outside of the felloe. When the tire, with one-fourth of an inch draw, comes on this felloe, it will draw it down tightly on the shoulder of the spoke at N N, and will not spring the spoke as it would if the tenon extended through the felloe so that the tire would press on it.

The method of using the wheel gauge shown in Fig 126 - Fig 127

Fig. 126 is a gauge for squaring the rim of the wheel. The part A is five feet long, one and a half by two inches, straight. B is a movable block, with a mortise through it, so that it will slide on A. 0 is a key to fasten B on A. B at 0 should be set square to A. Fig. 127 shows the manner of using the gauge illustrated in Fig. 126. The piece A rests on the felloes at D D, and lies on one side of the hub close to it. The block B shows when the felloe is square.óBy OLD FOGY.




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